Global Economy
US heads 2014 FDI Confidence Index; 11 European countries among top 25
By Michael Hennigan, Finfacts founder and editor
Jun 4, 2014 - 7:51 AM

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The US again heads the FDI Confidence Index (FDICI) survey and despite unresolved economic challenges in the Eurozone, 11 European countries still rank in the top 25, some entering the ranking for the first time; Canada moved up to the third spot; 39% of respondents voiced a more positive sentiment than last year for second-ranked China; and Russia (last year’s 11th rank) fell off the top 25 ranking, despite the fact that the survey was fielded prior to the current political imbroglio in Ukraine.

The annual FDI (foreign direct investment) Confidence Index, a forward looking indicator, was published this week by AT Kearney, the US consultancy, and is constructed using primary data from a proprietary survey administered to senior executives of the world’s leading corporations. Respondents include C-level (CEO, COO, CFO) executives and regional and business heads. The 300 participating companies represent 26 countries and span all industry sectors. All companies report global revenue of more than $500 million. Companies surveyed are evenly distributed across the globe, with roughly and third headquartered in Europe, a third in Asia-Pacific and a third in the Americas. The survey was conducted in January and February 2014.

Europe attracts more than a quarter of the world’s total FDI inflows, due to its highly qualified labor force, sophisticated, well-heeled consumers, and world-class infrastructure. Northern European nations Sweden and Denmark make it to the top 25 for the first time while Belgium and the Netherlands return to the index after some time off investors’ radars. The UK, amid discussions of a potential opt-out from the EU, rose four positions to fourth. France, currently under President François Hollande’s efforts to increase the country’s competitiveness, has reclaimed a place in the top ten. - See more at:

AT Kearney says Europe attracts more than a quarter of the world’s total FDI inflows, due to its highly qualified labour force, sophisticated, well-heeled consumers, and world-class infrastructure. Northern European nations Sweden and Denmark make it to the top 25 for the first time while Belgium and the Netherlands return to the index after some time off investors’ radars.

The UK, amid discussions of a potential opt-out from the EU, rose four positions to fourth. France, currently under President François Hollande’s efforts to increase the country’s competitiveness, has reclaimed a place in the top ten.

Preference for Ireland is not known as only the top 25 rankings are published. However, given teh overdependence on US companies, the feedback from a sample taht is globally diverse, is not welcome news for IDA Ireland, teh inward investment agency.

In January 2014, President Barack Obama referred to the prior FDICI findings in his State of the Union address, saying, “For the first time in over a decade, business leaders have declared that China is no longer the world’s number one place to invest; America is.”

AT Kearney report


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