| Click for the Finfacts Ireland Portal Homepage |

Finfacts Business News Centre

Home 
 
 News
 Irish
 Irish Economy
 EU Economy
 US Economy
 UK Economy
 Global Economy
 International
 Property
 Innovation
 
 Analysis/Comment
 
 Asia Economy

RSS FEED


How to use our RSS feed

Follow Finfacts on Twitter

 
Web Finfacts

See Search Box lower down this column for searches of Finfacts news pages. Where there may be the odd special character missing from an older page, it's a problem that developed when Interactive Tools upgraded to a new content management system.

Welcome

Finfacts is Ireland's leading business information site and you are in its business news section.

Links

Finfacts Homepage

Irish Share Prices

Euribor Daily Rates

Irish Economy

Global Income Per Capita

Global Cost of Living

Irish Tax - Income/Corporate

Global News

Bloomberg News

CNN Money

Cnet Tech News

Newspapers

Irish Independent

Irish Times

Irish Examiner

New York Times

Financial Times

Technology News

 

Feedback

 

Content Management by interactivetools.com.

News : Innovation Last Updated: Nov 19, 2012 - 8:14 AM


World Bank says world barrelling down path to heat up by 4 degrees at the end of the century
By Finfacts Team
Nov 19, 2012 - 7:03 AM

Email this article
 Printer friendly page

The world is barrelling down a path to heat up by 4 degrees at the end of the century if the global community fails to act on climate change, triggering a cascade of cataclysmic changes that include extreme heat-waves, declining global food stocks and a sea-level rise affecting hundreds of millions of people, according to a new scientific report released today that was commissioned by the World Bank.

All regions of the world would suffer - - some more than others - - – but the report finds that the poor will suffer the most.

Turn Down the Heat, a snapshot of the latest climate science prepared for the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and Climate Analytics, says that the world is on a path to a 4 degree Celsius[1] (4°C) warmer world by end of this century and current greenhouse gas emissions pledges will not reduce this by much.. 

“A 4 degree warmer world can, and must be, avoided – we need to hold warming below 2 degrees,” said World Bank Group president Jim Yong Kim.  “Lack of action on climate change threatens to make the world our children inherit a completely different world than we are living in today. Climate change is one of the single biggest challenges facing development, and we need to assume the moral responsibility to take action on behalf of future generations, especially the poorest.”

The report says that the 4°C scenarios are potentially devastating: the inundation of coastal cities; increasing risks for food production potentially leading to higher under and malnutrition rates; many dry regions becoming dryer, wet regions wetter; unprecedented heat waves in many regions, especially in the tropics; substantially exacerbated water scarcity in many regions; increased intensity of tropical cyclones; and irreversible loss of biodiversity, including coral reef systems.

"The Earth system's responses to climate change appear to be non-linear," says PIK director, John Schellnhuber. "If we venture far beyond the 2 degrees guardrail, towards the 4 degrees line, the risk of crossing tipping points rises sharply. The only way to avoid this is to break the business-as-usual pattern of production and consumption."

The report notes, however, that a 4°C world is not inevitable and that with sustained policy action warming can still be held below 2°C, which is the goal adopted by the international community and one that already brings some serious damages and risks to the environment and human populations.

Turn Down The Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided summarises a range of the direct and indirect climatic consequences under the current global path for greenhouse gas emissions. Key findings include:

  • Extreme heat waves, that without global warming would be expected to occur once in several hundred years, will be experienced during almost all summer months in many regions.  The effects would not be evenly distributed.  The largest warming  would be expected to occur over land and range from 4° C to 10° C.  Increases of 6° C or more in average monthly summer temperatures would be expected in the Mediterranean, North Africa, Middle East and parts of the United States;
  • Sea level-rise by 0.5 to 1 meter by 2100 is likely, with higher levels also possible. Some of the most highly vulnerable cities are located in Mozambique, Madagascar, Mexico, Venezuela, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam;
  • The most vulnerable regions are in the tropics, sub-tropics and towards the poles, where multiple impacts are likely to come together;
  • Agriculture, water resources, human health, biodiversity and ecosystem services are likely to be severely impacted.  This could lead to large-scale displacement of populations and consequences for human security and economic and trade systems;
  • Many small islands may not be able to sustain their populations.  

The report states that the science is unequivocal that humans are the cause of global warming, and major changes are already being observed. The global mean temperature has continued to increase and is now about 0.8°C above pre-industrial levels. 

While a global warming of 0.8°C may not seem large, the report notes that many climate change impacts have already started to emerge, and the shift from 0.8°C to 2.0°C warming or beyond will pose much larger challenges.  But a global mean temperature increase of 4°C approaches the known historic level of change for the planet, which harks back to the last ice age when much of central Europe and the northern United States were covered with kilometres of ice and global mean temperatures were about 4.5°C  to 7°C lower. And this contemporary human-induced climate change, the report notes, is occurring over a century, not millennia.

[1] 4 degrees Celsius = 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit

Check out our subscription service, Finfacts Premium , at a low annual charge of €25 - - if you are a regular user of Finfacts, 50 euro cent a week is hardly a huge ask to support the service.

Related Articles
Related Articles


© Copyright 2011 by Finfacts.com

Top of Page

Innovation
Latest Headlines
Digital Taylorism: Amazon's chief rejects depiction of "soulless, dystopian workplace"
Most surviving startups do not grow; Tiny number powers jobs engine
Despite euro dip China & US remain most competitive manufacturing nations
Business startup rates up in most OECD countries led by Australia and UK
NASA's Kepler mission has confirmed the first near-Earth-size planet
Energy subsidies at 6.5% of global GDP; Commodity prices to remain weak
US startups rely on personal savings, debt; Venture capital funds less than 1%
Europe produces 13 $1bn+ "unicorn" startups in one year; London is Europe's digital capital
Irish-based firms raised €120m in VC funding in Q1 2015; Some top recipients Irish for tax purposes
Ireland: Fourth highest 25-34 year old ratio of third-level graduates in developed world: So what?
Business dynamism/ employer firm startups in US secular decline
Innovation Union Scoreboard 2015: Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Germany are on top
Education systems failing to provide students with skills for success in 21st century
US, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland have best higher education systems
Handbook of Service Innovation: Ireland moving up the value chain?
Switzerland revives silk industry that thrived for two centuries
Sales of Irish tech firms create 300 millionaires in 15 years and no scaleups
Apple warns of 'material' tax payments from EU's Irish tax investigation
Apple earnings surge 33% on higher price and iPhone sales jump in China
Big Pharma's internationalisation of R&D to China
The dangers of romanticising entrepreneurs despite key role
UK and Irish business R&D heavily reliant on foreign-owned firms
Silicon Valley and the development of the silicon microchip - Part 2
Ireland: Innovation with or without R&D/ scientific breakthroughs
UK government most open/ transparent in world; Ireland & Greece lowest ranking in Europe
10 questions about Switzerland's Solar Impulse aircraft – answered
Silicon Valley loses its silicon; Typical household income stagnates - Part 1
21st century skills are 18 century skills + a computer
Growing ICT sector in Europe accounts for 5% of employment
Should Ireland copy Singapore's scientific research investment plan?
Startups vs Scaleups: 4% of UK startups have 10+ employees 10 years later
Irish patent filings at European Patent Office fell in 2014
Facebook's maze of privacy settings maybe in breach of European law
Apple to invest €1.7bn in Irish and Danish data centres
Silicon Valley insider warns of dodgy $1bn valuations of private companies
Israel's Startup Nation not a jobs engine; Nor is Irish high tech
Established industries often beat new technology investment returns
Ireland: Noonan said EU to drop Apple tax case; Now expects court case
Irish R&D Tax Credit: No evidence of rising business innovation; Facts don't matter
Apple reports biggest profit of a public company in history