Innovation
Smartphone owners’ demand for new apps falls
By Finfacts Team
Aug 19, 2014 - 8:01 AM

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Smartphone owners’ demand for new apps has waned with almost a third of smartphone users not downloading any apps for their devices in a typical month.

This should not be surprising as the typical non-tech industry smartphone user would only bother downloading apps that are relevant to interests and making day-to-day routines more convenient.

A unit of Deloitte, the Big 4 accounting firm, in a forthcoming report, says that according to their research only around 10% of smartphone users buy apps or other content regularly while 31% of global smartphone users do not download any apps in a typical month, a rise from around 20% a year ago.

The average number of apps downloaded has fallen from 2.3 to 1.8 in the same period.

"The UK is a bellwether for the mobile industry and it is a mature market that is home to many top developers," Deloitte head of tech, media and telecoms Paul Lee told Sky News.

"Early adopters have bought their apps and most new smartphone users are older and not included to rush out and buy lots of apps."

"People like to say they enjoy change but they don't, they prefer the path of least resistance," Lee said.

"It's a Darwinian process. Ironically, existing apps are getting better with tweaks and so people feel less inclined to look for new apps."

Last week, King Digital Entertainment plc, an Irish letter-box holding company - - operating from the office of a Dublin law firm - - for the maker of the Candy Crush Saga mobile game and other games, posted a drop in revenues and on Monday, its share price in New York closed at $13.52, down from last March's IPO price of $22.50.

Half revenues of $594m in the second quarter came from Candy Crush and 10.3m of the 485m playing its games in recent months lay for upgrades.


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